Oct 052017
 

Bruce wore tiger-striped reading glasses today. Some I picked up from the dollar store. He has no fashion sense and doesn’t care, so it’s amusing when he is accidentally in style.

He needed a bandage because he just had something on his face treated by the dermatologist. So I heard him yell, “Don’t tell me this is all we have for bandaids?”

I responded, “What? You don’t like bright purple ones? Lime green? How about the ones with hearts? Oh, and we have some with Minions on them!”

Tiger stripes framed the resignation in his eyes. He must have sensed what was not fashionable right then. Imagine that. 🙂

Bruce has always had my back. I wouldn’t have been able to do what I did with Lilly without him. Working with a traumatized child is an uphill climb, and you have to have some help along the way. Maybe the “Bruce” in your life is a close friend, a brother, or a group of parents supporting each other. Don’t try to go for any length of time by yourself.

Where can you find some support? Try your local foster agency, either county or private. They will know about support groups. Ask around if you belong to a church. Here are organizations that are helpful:

BEYOND Trauma and Attachment (BETA)  A Facebook open support group . They offer humor, information, and retreats.

Attachment & Trauma Network (ATN)   Great international resource with a crisis hotline: 888-656-9806.

The National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children is on Face Book. TLC 

Institute for Attachment and Child Development IACD

See my RESOURCE tab on the home page for more help. <3 Nealie

*(Minions is a trademark of Universal City Studios LLC)

 

Mar 102017
 

                                                                                                        Chasing Lilly

Chasing Lilly is meant to be a teaching tool for students in Psychiatry, Psychology, Counseling, and Intervention Specialties. That’s why there is a companion Discussion Workbook. Profs can use this true story as a case study. Students decide whether to confirm or disagree with Lilly’s diagnosis, talk over what could (or should) have been done in certain situations, medications, etc.

If you know a Professor or University Chair in any of these studies, please pass this on to them as they plan for the coming year. The books are available at Amazon or Barnes and Noble online.

Love my readers! Nealie

Dec 192016
 

fire safety

I was baking with my granddaughter, Ari, and had a candle with three wicks burning on the counter. Watching the flames made me think that  it would be a great time to give a little kitchen-fire safety talk.

I went over the basics:  if oil or grease is involved, never put water on it; put a lid on a pan that has caught fire; if there is no extinguisher; dump flour or sugar on the flames; stop, drop, and roll, etc.

Not more than two minutes after I finished, a napkin near the candle caught fire! I snatched it up to get it to the sink, but it burst into a fire-ball halfway there, and landed on the floor.

Ari yelled, “Dump flour on it!”

I did.

Do you have any idea how big of a mess that made? 😀

I still can’t get over how weird that all was, but please, go over fire safety with the kids, especially during this season when so many candles are burning.

Merry Christmas to you all!

🙂 Nealie

 

15 Awesome Alternatives to Screen Time

 Children, General Information  Comments Off on 15 Awesome Alternatives to Screen Time
Nov 112016
 

too much screen timeTime is short for raising our kids to be productive and happy adults. I think there are four groups of parents when it comes to kids and screen time:

-One uses gadgets for a babysitter and to free up their own time.

-The other group begrudgingly allows screen time, because that’s what all kids want to do, and they don’t want their child left out.

-The third group is a combination of the the other two: a little babysitter and a little of wanting their kids to have what’s popular.

-The fourth group opts out in favor of other activities. Steve Jobs was a surprising example.

The kids want TV and electronics because they are entertaining. At what cost? And eye contact, what is that?

Awesome Alternatives:

Give your child have a blank page on the computer to write a story. Their story-telling creativity might surprise you. Or they could write a letter. You could teach them how to scan, email, and print – all practical skills a video game can’t teach.

Indoor or outdoor challenges, like how many times can you bounce a ball without losing control of it? Then try to break the record! We have done an indoor balloon game where a balloon gets tossed in the air between two people, back and forth while you count how many times it was batted before it eventually lands on the floor. If the hits total 50, then next time try to get past fifty and break the record.

Reading. I used to have the kids read and then be prepared for questions when they were done with the book. Read a book together if your reader is young, by alternating pages between you.

Legos and Lincoln Logs increase manual dexterity and require creative thinking. There are many building-type products out there.

Scouts (They do all kinds of things!)

Life skills. Do your kids know how to wash windows, set the table for dinner, do a load of clothes, change a vacuum bag or empty the vac receptacle? Are you preparing them to be on their own someday?

Exercising. Most homes have the possibility for somehow doing laps in the house if the weather is bad. Right now, one grandson is up to 54 laps indoors. He runs through the kitchen and does a loop through the living room, down the hall and back to the kitchen. On the way, he scoops up a small weight and carries it a lap before bending down to put the weight back on the floor for the next lap, and alternating.

Play Doh sculpting.

Teach how to make a homemade birthday card or a thank you note.

Service to others makes a person feel good and teaches empathy. Ask, “What could you do to help so-and-so?”

Cards and board games teach winning and losing gracefully, and not quitting.

Scrabble. An awesome game that allows breaks between plays if they are needed.

Classic Battleship. If you’ve never played it, you have no idea what fun it is out-maneuvering your opponent.

Simple kitchen tasks that help with meal preparation will go a long way toward the goal of independence one day. Meals don’t magically appear!

Take a walk, ride bikes….fight couch potato syndrome and childhood obesity.

Love my readers, Nealie