Jan 152015
 

volcano kitSeveral of my grandkids know that I like to make volcanoes with play-dough, baking soda and vinegar. (I mentioned how to make those in a past post.)

Recently, I was excited to find a kit to make a sand and plaster volcano. Ari and Sev were there during the plaster-mixing, and spent the night while the volcano dried for 24 hours on top of the fridge.

The kit came with orange “lava” tablets, (yay!), and I had to buy some club soda to go with them. So we were excited and all set to see how our fairly realistic volcano would look with the lava oozing out of it. The directions even said not to get too close, and that added to the excitement!

When it came time to pour the soda into the volcano, we realized that we had a problem. The volcano kit had not figured in a bottom for the volcano. Anything poured into it would simply be dumped out onto the table. UGH!!! There was no eruption, (except for our protests of disbelief). We think that we followed the directions, so it should have worked.

I have been thinking about it all day. Did we miss something? It occurred to me that some kids are like that volcano kit. You can do everything according to the directions (or expert advice), but sometimes there are malfunctions because they have been damaged in some way. The big difference, though, is that with the damaged kids, you are very likely to get volcanic eruptions when you don’t want them!

Whether the lava is spewing at your house or not, hang in there! Check out my resource page for some helps. And speaking of helps, if you haven’t read Chasing Lilly, please do! You don’t need a Kindle. When you order it, give an email address, and it will be sent to your computer. Easy-peasy. Love my readers! -Nealie

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